HomeSudbury News

Aging population sparks analysis of home-care services

By: Jonathan Migneault - Sudbury Northern Life

 | Feb 20, 2014 - 1:07 PM |
By 2030, people over the age of 65 are expected to make up 30 per cent of northeastern Ontario's population. Health-care professionals say the demographic change will put more strain on the health-care system, and increase the need for home-care services. File photo.

By 2030, people over the age of 65 are expected to make up 30 per cent of northeastern Ontario's population. Health-care professionals say the demographic change will put more strain on the health-care system, and increase the need for home-care services. File photo.

Report will recommend how the North East CCAC should manage home care

As home and community care becomes a greater priority, to help offload pressure on hospitals, the North East Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) has decided to undertake what it has termed an analysis of the North East Community Care Access Centre (CCAC).

The North East LHIN has hired the consulting firm called the Hay Group to review the North East CCAC's operational structure and services.

With around $130 million in funding, the North East CCAC is the largest home service provider that operates under the LHIN.

The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care first established the CCACs in 1996 to provide a first point of contact for public access to government-funded home care, community services and long-term care homes.

In 2007, the 43 CCAC offices across the province were amalgamated to align with the 14 LHINs.

The North East CCAC was aligned to cover a huge geographic area — from the James Bay Coast south to Parry Sound east to Mattawa and west to Wawa. The alignment created six main branches — Sudbury, North Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Timmins, Kirkland Lake and Parry Sound — with 15 satellite offices, 10 hospital offices and a head office in Sudbury.

“As people get older, their health care needs increase and their need to be cared for at home or in the community increases,” said Cynthia Stables, a spokesperson for the North East LHIN.

Around 19 per cent of northeastern Ontario's population is over the age of 65, but that number is expected to balloon to 30 per cent by 2030, Stables said.

One of the North East LHIN's key priorities — outlined in its strategic plan — is to smooth and enhance patients' transitions through the health-care system.

Home care makes up an important piece of those transitions. The Hay Group has been tasked with analyzing how the North East CCAC delivers home-care services, and gauge the increasing need for those services in future years.

That report — which will include a multi-year service management plan — is expected by June.

Stables said it will also speak to the North East CCAC's operational structure and how it can best meet home-care demands.

“We’re confident the collaborative capacity analysis will assist both the North East LHIN and North East CCAC in ensuring the appropriate level of service continues to be available today and into the future to support the care needs of northerners,” said Sean Barrette, a spokesperson for the North East CCAC.
 
Jonathan Migneault

Jonathan Migneault

Staff Writer

@jmigneault

Reader's Feedback

NorthernLife.ca may contain content submitted by readers, usually in the form of article comments. All reader comments and any opinions, advice, statements or other information contained in any messages posted or transmitted by any third party are the responsibility of the author of that message and not of NorthernLife.ca. The fact that a particular message is posted on or transmitted using this web site does not mean that NorthernLife.ca has endorsed that message in any way or verified the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any message. We encourage visitors to NorthernLife.ca to report any objectionable content by using the "report abuse" link found in the comments section of this web site. Comment Guidelines


comments powered by Disqus

Most Popular

Local Business Directory