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Slow start to spring runoff beneficial for Sudbury: NDCA

By: Sudbury Northern Life Staff

 | Apr 09, 2014 - 11:26 AM |
This file photo shows spring thaw conditions from a year ago. Currently, the slow start to the spring runoff continues, which is a benefit at this time as there is still significant snowpack with high water content in many areas, said the Nickel District Conservation Authority in its watershed conditions statement. File photo.

This file photo shows spring thaw conditions from a year ago. Currently, the slow start to the spring runoff continues, which is a benefit at this time as there is still significant snowpack with high water content in many areas, said the Nickel District Conservation Authority in its watershed conditions statement. File photo.

The slow start to the spring runoff continues, which is a benefit at this time as there is still significant snowpack with high water content in many areas, said the Nickel District Conservation Authority in its watershed conditions statement.

There are currently no overland flooding problems reported to the NCDA. The current Environment Canada five-day forecast does not indicate any extreme weather in the Greater Sudbury watersheds.

Water levels and flows are increasing on the urban waterways due to the snowmelt and runoff. Ground conditions are frozen, which means runoff is not being absorbed and is going directly into the creeks and rivers. The developing conditions must be closely monitored by all residents living in known low-lying hazard areas.

The larger river systems within the City of Greater Sudbury, namely the Vermillion, Wanapitei and Onaping, with the headwaters well north of the city, have not reacted as yet to the initial snowmelt.

Peak runoff from the northern reaches of these major rivers will take time and will depend on weather conditions over the next three to four weeks or more. The runoff from the watersheds of these rivers eventually has to make its way down through the city.

The NDCA remains in direct contact with the City of Greater Sudbury and all other partners as required.

“Public safety is absolutely the No. 1 priority,” said the NDCA in a press release. “The fast-flowing, cold water must be avoided. Creek and river banks will be very slippery and unsafe, and must be avoided. Ice at the edge of lakes will soon start to open up and this must also be avoided.”

Any residents in the City of Greater Sudbury who may experience problems due to overland runoff or flooding are asked to call 311, 24 hours a day.

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