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Flood fears have eased, but officials keeping close watch

By: Sudbury Northern Life Staff

 | Apr 23, 2014 - 1:19 PM |
Images such as this -- taken earlier this month on Auger Street -- are no longer prevalent in Greater Sudbury, as warm, dry weather has reduced flood risks. File photo.

Images such as this -- taken earlier this month on Auger Street -- are no longer prevalent in Greater Sudbury, as warm, dry weather has reduced flood risks. File photo.

Warm weather, lack of rain helping moderate risks

 Flood fears are easing in Greater Sudbury, but it will be a few weeks before the full effects of the spring melt will pass, says the Nickel District Conservation Authority.

In an updated flood outlook released Wednesday, officials say the ground is finally thawing, which means it can absorb more water as temperatures rise.


“Water levels and flow continue to slowly moderate on all watercourses within Greater Sudbury watersheds,” the release said. “It will take time to see water levels drop and significant rainfall would definitely increase levels and flow almost immediately.”

But with no rain forecast in the coming days, that's not a problem in the short term. A major source of concern is the speed with which large rivers north of Sudbury – Vermilion, Wanapitei and Onaping – melt and send ice our way. While ice has left most sections of the river, the NDCA says spring runoff hasn't peaked from the river systems. Heavy rain in the next two or three weeks could cause problems.

“The runoff from the watersheds from these rivers will eventually have to make its way down to the city,” the release said.

In a recent safety message sent to all Sudbury media, Ward 12 Coun. Joscelyne Landry-Altmann asked journalists to “use your media power” to get the water safety message out to the community.

“The river and creek banks are very slippery and the water is cold and unforgiving,” Landry-Altmann wrote. “Parents should be made aware of the dangers of these rivers and creeks that are higher and faster than normal that meander throughout our communities.”

Flooding issues can be reported to the main city line, 311. Other emergencies should be directed to 911.

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