HomeSudbury News

Two buildings more than 100 years old given heritage status

By: Darren MacDonald - Sudbury Northern Life

 | May 13, 2014 - 8:58 PM |
The David Street Waterworks building was erected in 1896, supplying the former Town of Sudbury with electricity. It's still in use as a water plant. The building has been added to the municipal heritage registry, along with the Copper Cliff fire station. File photo.

The David Street Waterworks building was erected in 1896, supplying the former Town of Sudbury with electricity. It's still in use as a water plant. The building has been added to the municipal heritage registry, along with the Copper Cliff fire station. File photo.

Designation gives Copper Cliff fire station, south end water plant special protection

 Two historic buildings more than a century old have been added to the city's heritage register, a designation that gives them added protection should someone want to redevelop them or tear them down.

If confirmed by city council later this month, the Copper Cliff fire station on Serpentine Street and the David Street Water Treatment Plant will be added to the municipal heritage register. The register is a list of buildings in Greater Sudbury with significant historical value.
 


The fire station and water treatment plant are both owned by the city. Adding a privately owned property to the register means the owner must give the city 60 days notice before any demolition of any building or structure on the property takes place.

Meeting Monday, members of the city's planning committee approved adding the two buildings to the list, which already includes seven structures in Greater Sudbury. The building were recommended for the list by Municipal Heritage Advisory Panel, which was created in 2008.

“Listing these properties on the heritage register ensures that these historical buildings are formally identified as properties that may have cultural heritage value or interest to the community,” Sheila Prusila, chair of the panel, said in a news release.

“This is an important tool in planning for their conservation and a measure of interim protection.”

The panel is tasked with identifying, researching and evaluating potential heritage sites and advising city council which should be included on the heritage register. Since it's a relatively new list, the panel is focusing on city-owned sites first.

Assuming their designations as heritage buildings is confirmed, plaques will be mounted on the structures “to recognize their cultural heritage value,” a staff report on the plan said.

While easily approving the designations, Ward 7 Coun. Dave Kilgour said many historic buildings in the city have been lost because the register didn't exist earlier to protect them.

“I think there's a feeling we started this about 40 years too late,” Kilgour said.

The Copper Cliff fire station was built in 1909 and 1910, and originally featured a tall lookout tower. It was the first fire station in the town, and is still used today as a storefront for the Greater Sudbury Police.

The David Street Water Treatment Plant building was erected in 1896, supplying the former Town of Sudbury with electricity. It's still in use as a water plant.
 

Buildings already on the city's heritage register:

-- Church of the Epiphany on Larch Street

-- Flour Mill silos on Notre Dame Avenue

-- Bell Mansion, where the Art Gallery of Sudbury is located

-- CP Rail Station on Elgin Street

-- St. Anne Rectory, Beech Street

-- The Belanger homestead, on Notre Dame Street in Azilda

-- Capreol Railway Station, Bloor Street, Capreol

Darren MacDonald

Darren MacDonald

Staff Writer

@Darrenmacd

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