HomeSudbury News

'Top heavy' CCAC needs overhaul, report suggests

By: Jonathan Migneault - Sudbury Northern Life

 | Aug 15, 2014 - 5:01 PM |
An analysis by Hay Group Health Consulting made 16 recommendations for the North East CCAC to improve its home and community health services across northeastern Ontario. With an aging population in northeastern Ontario, the North East CCAC faces a growing need for home care services. File photo.

An analysis by Hay Group Health Consulting made 16 recommendations for the North East CCAC to improve its home and community health services across northeastern Ontario. With an aging population in northeastern Ontario, the North East CCAC faces a growing need for home care services. File photo.

Analysis makes 16 recommendations to improve the home care service provider

The North East Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) will need to cut back on management and improve communication with partners across Northern Ontario, according to a new analysis commissioned by the North East Local Health Integration Network (LHIN). 


The analysis, conducted over a six-month period by Hay Group Health Care Consulting, made 16 recommendations that range from improving the timeliness of care to ensuring the organization is “administratively lean.”



The Hay Group interviewed a number of external stakeholders — including staff and management at hospitals and long-term care facilities across northeastern Ontario — who said they perceived the North East CCAC to be “top heavy.”

“While other CCACs have reduced or minimally increased their management and operational support FTEs (full-time equivalents), the NE CCAC has seen the largest growth in this category of staff in the province this year, and for the last three years,” the report said.

“NE CCAC has added new programs that other CCACs have not added, but have not increased the number of patients being served to the same degree that other CCACs in Ontario have.”

Louise Paquette, CEO of the North East LHIN, said the North East CCAC has a lot of room for improvement.

“I think the organization seriously needs to look at their design and how they are organized,” she said.

Last fiscal year, the North East LHIN provided $131 million for the North East CCAC to provide home and community-based health care across the northeast.

That included $11 million in extra funding to address a projected deficit of $12.5 million for the 2013-2014 fiscal year.
“We can't just find excuses,” Paquette said. “$131 million is a lot of money.”

Lloy Schindeler, the North East CCAC's senior director of clinical services, said the organization had to hire more managers than other CCACs to cover the region's vast geographic area. The North East CCAC, she said, covers around 42 per cent of Ontario's landmass.

“Compared some of the smaller geographic areas in the south, where they may only have two or three hospitals to work with, we find there is a large demand by small rural communities for us to have some leaders present,” Schindeler said.

The northeast region includes 25 hospitals — many of them quite small — and hundreds of long-term care facilities, she added.

The report said the North East CCAC has faced growing demand for its services, which has made it more difficult for it to respond to client needs and operate with the financial resources available to it.

“However, our comparisons of changes in demand across all CCACs shows that the pressures faced by the NE CCAC are not unique,” the report continued. “Other CCACs have faced greater demands and have not had increases in costs as significant as the NE CCAC.”

Those cost increases, Schindeler said, have been due in part to a number of new programs the North East CCAC introduced in 2013.

Those included a new telehomecare program, a mental health and addictions program, and a program that brings palliative care services from nurse practitioners certain northern communities.

“Because we're such a geographically huge CCAC, we've had to hire more nurses than some of the other CCACs,” Schindeler said.
Last year, the North East CCAC hired 16 nurses and two managers to cover more remote regions.

To make the changes necessary to meet the report's 16 recommendations, Schindeler said the North East CCAC will need to collaborate more with partners on the field and thinks of northern solutions to connect patients with the care they require.

Richard Joly, the North East CCAC's CEO, and Ron Farrell, chair of its board, will present a detailed plan to address the Hay Group's 16 recommendations to the North East LHIN on Sept. 23.
Jonathan Migneault

Jonathan Migneault

Staff Writer

@jmigneault

Reader's Feedback

NorthernLife.ca may contain content submitted by readers, usually in the form of article comments. All reader comments and any opinions, advice, statements or other information contained in any messages posted or transmitted by any third party are the responsibility of the author of that message and not of NorthernLife.ca. The fact that a particular message is posted on or transmitted using this web site does not mean that NorthernLife.ca has endorsed that message in any way or verified the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any message. We encourage visitors to NorthernLife.ca to report any objectionable content by using the "report abuse" link found in the comments section of this web site. Comment Guidelines


comments powered by Disqus

Most Popular

Local Business Directory