Festive RIDE nets five impaired charges in December

Police services in Sudbury spent the month of December conducting the annual Festive RIDE program, which resulted in five impaired charged being handed out. File photo.

Police services in Sudbury spent the month of December conducting the annual Festive RIDE program, which resulted in five impaired charged being handed out. File photo.

Jan 09, 2013

By: Sudbury Northern Life Staff

The month-long Festive RIDE program saw five charges handed out for impaired driving or refusing a breath sample, said Greater Sudbury Police Service.

Throughout the entire campaign, police officers checked 8,968 vehicles and issued 12 three-, seven- and 30-day licence suspensions, as well as five 90-day licence suspensions after conducting 81 roadside screening tests.

Furthermore, police laid 155 Highway Traffic Act charges for various infractions, as well as six criminal charges for drug-related offences and breaches of court orders.

This year's campaign saw a decrease by more than half the number of drivers charged with impaired in 2011. Last year, police laid 11 impaired driving or refusal charges.

That was after officers checked 10,214 vehicles and made 114 demands for breath samples. Twenty-four drivers had their licences suspended, half of which were for 90-day suspensions.

Police issued 173 Highway Traffic Act tickets, and laid 18 criminal charges for dangerous driving and break and enter.

The Festive RIDE campaign was held in partnership with Greater Sudbury Police Service, the Ontario Provincial Police and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Greater Sudbury Police Service said although the festive season has come and gone, it will continue the RIDE program throughout 2013 and officers will remain vigilant in stopping impaired drivers.

Police encourage individuals who see an impaired driver or suspect someone is driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs are urged to call 911. These actions will continue to act as a deterrent to potential impaired drivers by demonstrating the increased likelihood of apprehension.



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